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Congress Wary of Syria

Lawmakers opposed to strikes against Syria push back against White House plans.
(NBC News) The debate over possible U.S. Intervention in Syria continues to play out in Washington.

On Wednesday, Secretary of State John Kerry urged house members to ok a strike in Syria.

This is not the time to be spectators to a slaughter," Kerry told members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

But the President's plan hit snags in the Senate where ranking republican and former P.O.W. John McCain said he'd vote no unless the plan expands to help Syrian rebels overthrow the dictator who's accused of using chemical weapons.

"The President has said Bashir al-Assad must go. Our policy has to be implement what the President has said," said McCain.

But like the U.S. public, many lawmakers oppose U.S. intervention.

"I see a horrible tragedy but i don't see our involvement will lessen the tragedy," said republican Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky.

"I believe the U.S. military should be focused on one thing: protecting the vital national security interest of the United States of America," said Texas republican Senator Ted Cruz.

To pressure Congress, President Obama, in Sweden, honored Raul Wallenberg, who saved thousands of Jews in the holocaust.

"The moral thing to do is not to stand by and do nothing," the President said.

He said the world, not he drew the red line on chemical weapons.

"My credibility's not on the line. The international community's credibility is on the line," said Mr. Obama.
Back on the hill, some asked: then why act alone?

"I've yet to hear some concrete things of what the world is doing," said democratic Congressman Gregory Meeks of New York.

When asked what happens if congress doesn't approve the legislation to take military action in Syria, the President responded, "I believe that Congress will approve it. I believe Congress will approve it because I think America recognizes as difficult as it is to take any military action even one as limited as were talking, no boots on the ground that's a sober decision."

It's no doubt a nervous Congress, as the senate began drafting a bill to green light a strike on Syria.

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