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1200 Feared Dead in Philippines in Wake of Haiyan

One official says Typhoon Haiyan's aftermath has left so many deceased his city doesn't have enough body bags to handle all the dead.
By Eric Baculinao and Alastair Jamieson, NBC News

MANILA – A major city was in ruins and the hardest-hit parts 
of the Philippines remained cut off on Saturday, with one 
Red Cross official estimating that at least 1,200 people 
were killed by the largest storm ever to make landfall.

Typhoon Haiyan struck the archipelago early Friday and 
survivors of the storm described towering waves that swept 
away all but the hardiest shelters.

One resident of the hard-hit central Philippine city of Tacloban
said he and others took refuge inside a parked Jeep to protect 
themselves from the storm, but the vehicle was swept away by 
a wall of water.

"The water was as high as a coconut tree," 44-year-old Sandy Torotoro,
a bicycle taxi driver who lives near the airport with his wife and 
8-year-old daughter, told the Associated Press. "I got out of the 
Jeep and I was swept away by the rampaging water with logs, 
Typhoon Haiyan is currently tracking towards Vietnam. The storm is much weaker 
now with winds near 100 mph. 

Here is a live satellite loop of Typhoon Haiyan: http://1.usa.gov/1fmm1zG

Track tropical systems around the world on our Hurricane Tracker: 
http://www.texomashomepage.com/hurricane-tracker
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