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Anti Evaporation Chemical Demo Test

Wichita Falls City Councilors have approved cloud seeding, effluent reuse, studies of building a new lake, and many other measures to try to stretch our dwindling water supply.
Wichita Falls City Councilors have approved cloud seeding, effluent reuse, studies of building a new lake, and many other measures to try to stretch our dwindling water supply.

Tomorrow, they'll consider yet another idea to save water at Lake Arrowhead.

City councilors could decide whether that lake will become the site of another precedent- setting project for other areas suffering from drought.

They'll consider a proposal to cover the remaining surface of the lake with a substance marketed to greatly reduce the amount of water lost to evaporation.

If approved, the city will do a 2- and a half month trial at a cost of nearly $400,000.

Similar products are available for pools, but this method has only been studied on bodies of water about 100- times smaller than Lake Arrowhead.

The ingredient in the substance is similar to that used in pools, and we decided to try and see how effective it can be on a much, much smaller scale of course.

We filled two wading pools with equal amounts of water, and then added a small amount of the anti- evaporation product to the pink one.

They are set up side by side in the sun, and while this is by no means a strictly scientific test, it could give us some idea on whether you can really tell any difference in the water lost over several days.

We'll check back on the pools in the coming days and keep you updated.
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