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As Drought Continues Removing Dead Trees Safely Becomes A Priority

Last Friday a Wichita Falls man suffered a head injury while helping a neighbor cut down a dead tree.
Last Friday a Wichita Falls man suffered a head injury while helping a neighbor cut down a dead tree.

And with a continuing drought, this situation could become more frequent if people do not take the proper safety measures.

Cutting down and removing a large tree is no job for an amateur. Professional landscaper Paul Dowlearn knows trees. He explained, as spring approaches, it will become easier to tell if your trees have survived the drought. If they haven't, it's important to get them taken care of as soon as possible.

As Wichita Falls city officials work to find new sources of water,  trees and plants are also trying to find water that's no longer there.

“Trees that were old, very large trees, that really had tapped into that ground water lost their supply,” says Dowlearn.

And landscaper Dowlearn says when trees lose their water supply, they become a danger.

“The longer they stay dead that wood begins to get weak and begins to rot,” says Dowlearn.

And he says rotting trees are more likely to snap if you try to cut them. That's why, according to him, it's important to get your trees checked out and taken care of properly.

“I would call a professional. That's why these guys are there. This is obviously very dangerous work,” says Dowlearn.

And because a dead tree on your property could be a liability, Dowlearn says the sooner you call a professional, the better.

“A lot of times insurance companies will not cover a standing dead tree. It's too obvious that the tree's dead, you need to take it out,” says Dowlearn.

Dowleran says as bad as plants and trees appear now, he believes the chances of your trees surviving will only get better. The real damage was done in 2011 with record high temperatures and low rain fall.  However, he thinks the trend is changing for the better.

Dowlearn will be one of a variety of speakers talking about helping your plants and trees survive the drought at this weekends' Home and Garden Show.

Click here for more information.

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