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Athletic Advantage, Acclimation to heat

With temperatures consistently getting into the triple digits this time of year, doing anything outdoors can be tough.
With temperatures consistently getting into the triple digits this time of year, doing anything outdoors can be tough. But hitting the field for two a days. That can be a whole different animal. It's no surprise that if you're practicing outside this time of year, it's going to be hot. With athletes come back from that time off. They might think begin in shape is all they need to worry about. But they'd be wrong. Because according to Jeremy Woodward, Head athletic trainer at United Regional, when it's this hot, "they really need to get used to the heat. So going out and doing some physical activity, in the heat of the day, not overdoing it.  But just to get used to being out when it's really hot."
So before you hit the field, it's a good idea to do some kind of activities in the heat first. Maybe go play some golf. Get used to mowing the lawn. Or even just take some walks out in the heat. And once you're out in the heat, you need to keep a few things in mind, according to Woodward, "one is dehydration. That can cause a lot of different things. Muscle cramping, caused by imbalances in electrolytes."
You also have to worry about heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Both are preventable. And both have some recognizable symptoms. Here are just a few, Throbbing headache, Dizziness and light-headedness, Lack of sweating despite the heat, Red, hot, and dry skin, Muscle weakness or cramps, Nausea and vomiting, Rapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weak, Also dark concentrated urine. "urine color is a great indicator, if you urinate a dark concentrated urine, if it's really dark and yellow...You're probably not getting enough fluids."
And if an athlete has already been a victim of heat stroke or heat exhaustion, they're going to be more susceptible in the future. So be sure that trainers and coaches are keeping athletes hydrated with a mix of water and sports drinks, and monitoring any signs of dehydration of heat exhaustion before they become a problem.
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