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Athletic Advantage: Getting a Cast

Many of our Athletic Advantage stories aim to help you prevent injuries, but tonight Tobin McDuff shows us what to expect if you suffer a broken arm or leg.
Many of our Athletic Advantage stories aim to help you prevent injuries, but tonight Tobin McDuff shows us what to expect if you suffer a broken arm or leg.

Cast no doubt, a broken arm or leg can lead to weeks of misery.But the application and removal of a cast is pretty simple.

"Fiberglass dries very very quickly where the old plaster cast would take 48 hours to cure and this takes five minutes," says Certified Orthopedic Technician Russ Conroy. "I tell kids if they want to stick something inside the cast they can put their elbow. If they can get their elbow in there that's fine"

But what if the itching gets unbearable?

 "There are chemicals out now called "cast comfort" that has a long tube so you can spray it down inside the cast. It has alcohol so its cold, takes care of the itch and leaves a talcum residue so it takes care of the itch and smell," adds Conroy. "There are products you can put on your arm. You can go swimming in them, take showers or baths. It's over-the-counter. It's like the space bag technology where you suck the air out of it."

"There are some casts we can put on that you can get wet. It's Gore-Tex lined. Insurance will not pay for it. It's about $50 per cast," states Conroy.

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