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Bird Invasion Annoying Texomans

<br><font size=2> <P>It's the time of year when birds start migrating.</P> <P>But that's not the case with two annoying types of birds around Texoma.</P> <P>Grackles and starlings are now roosting for the winter.</P> <P>So we may be stuck with their annoying chatter and droppings for a while.</P> <P>But is there anything you can do to get the birds to buzz off?</P> <P>Mechell Dixon talked to a bird expert to find out.</P></font>

According to experts at Wild Bird Rescue chasing grackles and starlings out of your neighborhood can be tough.

But they say it is possible... but the ticket to success is in the timing.

When the sun begins setting the swarming starts but these aren't bees.

They're birds.

Grackles and starlings to be exact.

They come in to roost on any perch available whether trees, power lines or whatever makes them comfortable.

And even if you didn't see them arrive, you know they've been there by the mess they leave behind.

"In the wintertime it's advantageous for them to group together so predators are less likely to catch them and because they can fly they can spread out during the day and find food and still come back at night for a communal roost," says Penny Miller with Wild Bird Rescue in Wichita Falls.

But their roosting rubs many the wrong way.

So how annoying are they?

"On a one to ten scale I'd say 9. Why? They mess up our cars our sidewalks. They intrude our privacy," says Sue Conway, who is annoyed with the birds.

But one man chooses to see the positive side of these birds.

"They keep down all the pests that we've got. All the mosquitoes and other bugs like that. I don't mind all their droppings. They have to have a place to live just like we do," says Michael Myers, who tolerates the birds.

Grackles are federally protected while starlings are not.

However getting both to live somewhere else is possible but tough?

Bird experts say timing is the key.

"If you can shoo them off before they really become accustomed to your area, startle them so they're like, oh we don't like it here. There's too much commotion," says Miller.

While commotion annoys you it's what makes these birds of a feather flock together.

Some try to use a fake owl or hawk or a cannon noise to get the birds to leave but experts say those only work for a short while.

However, the best advice they can give is to be patient until the birds leave on their own, which they say should be around the first of the year.

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