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Boehner, McConnell Call on Obama to Detail Proposed Cuts in Fiscal Talks

<span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal; text-align: left; ">The top two Republicans in Congress demanded Tuesday that President Obama explain exactly what spending he would cut as part of any deal to avert the looming fiscal crisis, with House Speaker John Boehner making clear that a recent meeting between him and the president did not yield a deal.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal; text-align: left; "><br></span>

The top two Republicans in Congress demanded Tuesday that President Obama explain exactly what spending he would cut as part of any deal to avert the looming fiscal crisis, with House Speaker John Boehner making clear that a recent meeting between him and the president did not yield a deal. 

Boehner, speaking on the House floor, said the meeting at the White House Sunday afternoon was "cordial" -- but Republicans are "still waiting for the White House to identify what spending cuts the president is willing to make as part of the balanced approach that he promised the American people." 

Boehner said he remains "hopeful" a deal can be reached, but said Obama has an "obligation" to put forward a new and specific plan if he objects to the plan Republicans proffered last week. 

"The longer the White House slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff," he said. "We know that the president wants more stimulus spending and an increase in the debt limit without any cuts or reforms. That's not fixing our problem -- frankly, it's making it worse." 

The White House, though, rejected Boehner's claims. 

"The president, unlike any other party to these negotiations, has put forward detailed spending cuts as well as detailed revenue proposals," White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said Tuesday. 

Boehner did not indicate whether he and his team are considering any changes to the Republican negotiating position. Boehner, while putting revenue on the table, has all along rejected Obama's demand that tax rates increase next year on the top 2 percent. 

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