98°F
Sponsored by

Bullet Train Plan Sparks Turf War in Dallas-Fort Worth

It's been just over a year since a Japanese-backed firm announced plans to build a 205 mph bullet train between Houston and North Texas, and elected officials and advocates are anxiously waiting for more details.

It's been just over a year since a Japanese-backed firm announced plans to build a 205 mph bullet train between Houston and North Texas, and elected officials and advocates are anxiously waiting for more details.

That's especially true in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, where the region's decades-old turf war has been reignited by the prospects of where Texas Central High-Speed Railway plans to build its first North Texas station.

That local officials are focusing so much attention on a proposal that is at least six years away from implementation shows how seriously they are taking this latest plan to make passenger rail work in highway-loving Texas. While logistical, financial and regulatory issues have stymied previous efforts, Texas Central High-Speed Railway has silenced naysayers largely through the pedigree of its lead investor, Central Japan Railway Company, which already runs profitable bullet train lines in Japan. The company has also increased interest by vowing to develop the multibillion-dollar project without public subsidies.

"They have the investors behind them. They have the financing behind them. They have the technology. They can clearly build this," said Tom Shelton, senior program manager for the North Central Texas Council of Governments. "The missing piece here is, what are they going to propose and is everybody going to be supportive of that?"

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Poll

[[viewModel.Question]]

[[result.OptionText]] [[calculateVotePercent(result)]]%
[[settings.DelayedResultsMessage]]
Poll sponsored by