97°F
Sponsored by

Celebrating 100 Years of Scouting

  A hundred years ago Monday, Juliet Gordon Low and 18 girls gathered for the first ever Girl Scout meeting. These days, there are just over two million Girl Scout members nationwide.
    A hundred years ago Monday, Juliet Gordon Low and 18 girls gathered for the first ever Girl Scout meeting. These days, there are just over two million Girl Scout members nationwide. At precisely 7:12 Monday evening more than 200 scouts recited the girls scout promise in unison with other girls across North Texas. That time is approximately when the first Girl Scout meeting was called.
    Girl Scouts of America began in 1912 in Savannah, Georgia after their founder Juliet Gordon Low became so impressed by the scout movement aimed at boys, that she decided to launch an organization geared toward girls. Girls Scouts here in our community say they are proud to be part of such a monumental celebration, and seeing how far Scouting has come in the last 100 years.
     "I think she hoped it would but didn't have a whole grasp of what it would be. Because you learn a lot of things like helping your neighbor and following the Girl Scout Law," said Shelby Miller, Girl Scout.   
    "Well 100 years is special for anything, so to think that Juliet Low probably did not envision when she started scouting that 100 years later there would be all this enthusiasm and excitement among girls," said Sue Watson, Girl Scout of 62 years.
    Watson says throughout her scouting years she's seen the program empower and encourage women. And in honor of this centennial celebration, the United State's Post Office has created a stamp in celebration of the 100 years of scouting.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Poll

[[viewModel.Question]]

[[result.OptionText]] [[calculateVotePercent(result)]]%
[[settings.DelayedResultsMessage]]
Poll sponsored by