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City of Wichita Falls Testing Sewer Infrastructure

A Metroplex-based surveying crew is in Wichita Falls,  testing out the possibility of converting the mapping of the city's water and sewer systems to a digital format.
A Metroplex-based surveying crew is in Wichita Falls, studying the city's water and wastewater infrastructure.  They're testing out the possibility of converting the mapping of the city's water and sewer systems to a digital format.  Today is the first day they're out in the field conducting the studies.  Crews are studying the infrastructure between Fairway and Kemp Boulevard, from Kell to Lake Wichita.  Officials say this is the best area for the pilot study because it contains both residential and commercial, and new and old water and sewer lines.   


City officials are testing the waters, looking into whether or not it would be a good idea and a good use of funds to convert the mapping of the city's water and wastewater system to digital format.
   
Right now, the system is mapped out on paper format, which officials say is hard to filter through, especially during emergency situations.
   
Several surveying crews are conducting a test study in the city, and they'll be doing so through December 14th.

Public Works Operation Manager, Daniel Nix says, "Shooting in the man holes for the sewer system and getting elevations and how deep the man holes are.  On the water side, they're getting where the fire hydrants are located and where the valves are."

If the city decides to convert to the digital format, Nix says it will streamline the communication process between officials and residents when there are water main breaks or other problems.  The system gives field crews real time information.

Nix says, "We will be able to respond to the public and tell them, 'Look, you're going to be out of water for this amount of time,' and not carry over and tell somebody, 'You're going to be out of water,' when in fact they have water, or miss somebody and say, 'Well, you're fine,' but we actually did shut something off."


This test project cost about 40-thousand dollars.  The information will be collected and presented to city councilors as early as late February.

Nix says the information gathered will be used in the future to determine what water or wastewater infrastructure needs to be replaced.
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