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City Officials to Ask Council for Lake Volume Test

The test would estimate the amount of silt at the bottom of Lake Arrowhead and Lake Kickapoo.
    Wichita Falls is inching closer to tougher water restrictions as the lakes fall lower and lower, but could there be even less water in those lakes than city officials think?
    Public works officials want a more accurate estimate of how much water is actually in our lakes, and are asking city councilors for funds to a new survey.
    They are expected to make their request for nearly $43-thousand at tomorrow's meeting.
    The money would then be matched by the Army Corps of Engineers.
    It would fund a study for Arrowhead and Kickapoo lakes, so officials would know how much silt has built up in the bottom of the lakes and the volume of water that's actually left.
    Russell Schreiber, public works director for the City of Wichita Falls, says, "We use those numbers for long-range water planning, and we also use those numbers to set our drought trigger points that are based on lake percentages.  Obviously as the lakes fill with silt and get more silt in them, there's less water."
    Schreiber says it's been about ten years since the last volume study of the lake.
    He says the amount of silt in the lake could affect the measured lake levels, but only by a percent or two.
    If city councilors approved the funding, the study would get underway in the next several months but wouldn't be complete for at least a year after it starts.
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