75°F
Sponsored by

Consumer Reports Cracks the Code on Eggs

It doesn't matter which came first anymore, when you go to buy eggs in the supermarket, the eggs have clearly taken over! The choices seem endless and prices can vary widely.
It doesn't matter which came first anymore, when you go to buy eggs in the supermarket, the eggs have clearly taken over! The choices seem endless and prices can vary widely. Consumer Reports looked into it and found that not all eggs are what they're cracked up to be.

If you ask Hazel and Wendy Pucillo, you can't beat the taste of eggs you've gathered yourself.

"Ever since we started baking and cooking with fresh eggs, we definitely see a difference in the flavor of everything that comes out of the kitchen," she said.

She's right -- freshness matters. Experts at Consumer Reports tasted various eggs -- including supermarket brands, organic eggs, eggs with no antibiotics, no hormones, white eggs and brown eggs. They found taste deteriorated the closer an egg got to the date on the carton. But beyond that, the eggs all tasted pretty much the same.

So how do you choose? It's enough to make you feel, well, chicken about buying eggs.

Sue Perry of ShopSmart Magazine said, "There are many more choices now, and price differences can be dramatic. Some eggs cost twice as much as others."

For example, don't pay a nickel more for eggs because they say "no hormones."

"Well, they sound like a better choice, but the truth is the egg industry as a whole does not use hormones," Perry explains.

But you should consider paying more for organic eggs. They're better for people, chickens and the planet.

Dr. Urvashi Rangan, Consumer Reports Director of Safety said, "Eggs without antibiotics are another good choice. Just be sure the package says 'No antibiotics used.'"

How about brown versus white? Actually, it doesn't matter. It has no bearing on nutrition. So don't judge an egg by the color of its shell. It's what's on the inside that counts.

Consumer Reports say if you're a fan of Caesar salads, look for pasteurized eggs. They can be used in recipes that call for raw eggs.


Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Poll

[[viewModel.Question]]

[[result.OptionText]] [[calculateVotePercent(result)]]%
[[settings.DelayedResultsMessage]]
Poll sponsored by