Electra School Officials Safety is the Focus of the Bond Election

Electra School Officials Safety is the Focus of the Bond Election

When it comes to educating students safety is becoming more and more a priority.
Electra ISD has one more public meeting before next month's bond election. School officials say most of the nearly $12-million bond would fund a new building for junior high and high school students.

So far, no one person or group has a campaign or effort to get voters to say "no" to next month's bond election. And school officials think it may be because taxpayers see the safety of students as a priority.

When it comes to educating students safety is becoming more and more a priority but Electra's top school official says the building housing the Junior / Senior High School is more than 80 years old and no longer meets the minimum standards.

"This school here, in my opinion, is not adequate to be educating our children, whether we have 200 students or 1,000 students, whether we have the lakes full of water or no water," says Scott Hogue, Electra ISD superintendent.

"We've gone from nothing, no technology, pen and paper, to what we have now but our building won't support what we have now particularly well," says Mary Laura Slappey.

Mary Laura Slappey has taught Spanish at Electra Junior/Senior High for more than 40 years. She has a computer but says it's the only one  the outdated electrical system limits can  handle  in her classroom. Overload is also a problem in the science lab.

"If they plug in too many microscopes it will blow a breaker," Supt. Hogue says.

And Superintendent Hogue says there's another safety issue  as students make their way to the lab.

"We're suppose to have ventilation in here and kids walking through with all of our chemicals is not a safe thing to do," Hogue explains.

None of the residents we spoke to would take questions on camera but some said although they know a new school is needed they are concerned about paying more in property taxes. Still, school officials say the improved education of students will be well worth the increase in property taxes.

School officials say on a home valued at $50,000, the annual increase on property taxes would be $125 while taxes for those 65 and older who filled out the homestead exemption would not increase.
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