HHH Riders Adjust to Route Changes

HHH Riders Adjust to Route Changes

Thousands of riders crossed the finish line Saturday.
Thousands of riders crossed the finish line Saturday.

Each with their own motivation to ride.

“It's a roller coaster man, we start off strong and then it gets really awesome, you have your lows where your like, oh my gosh I don't know if I can do this and then you get your second wind,” says 100 mile rider from Fort Worth, Javier Herrera.

Herrera says everything was smooth until he pedaled 10 miles out of his way.

“We took a wrong turn, there was no one at the stop,” says Herrera.

When it got tough Herrera says he kept two things in mind to stay motivated.

“I think about my wife and kids, actually, the faster I can finish, the faster I can get home,” says Herrera.

And one rider from Shreveport Louisiana says her spouse was her motivation as well.

“The wind was really tough the last 20- miles, we had like a head wind and a cross wind but my husband was my domestique the whole way and he pulled me the whole hundred miles,” says Sarah Goeders.

This year the endurance ride took a different route making it 100 point 8 miles the closest it's been to 100 miles.

And cyclist Greg Brown from Mansfield says he has done the endurance ride about half a dozen times and he says the changes to the route really helped.

“The route that they cut off was poor roads and the roads that they replace it with was a little better,” says Brown.

But one change did not go over as well with Hotter'N Hell endurance ride veteran Bill Brinson from Austin as organizers have not had the spray down at the finish line since 2011 because of the record drought.

“I believe it was my first Hotter'N Hell I was really close to heat stroke and I got passed the finish line and I just stood in that spray for ten minutes,” says Brinson.

Overall he says he still had a great experience and hopes to come back next year.

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