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Katia, Maria & Nate Brewing in Atlantic

The NHC is monitoring a strong hurricane and three other areas that could quickly intensify including one in the Gulf.
The 2011 Atlantic Basin Hurricane Season has long been forecast to be a strong one and it appears the forecast is coming true.

So far there have been 11 named storms (as of 9pm Tuesday, September 6, 2011) with the latest named storm being Katia.

[An interesting side note is that Katia is the name chosen to replace Katrina.  After the devastating hurricane of 2005 the name was retired and needed to be replaced.]

Now, the National Hurricane Center is monitoring Hurricane Katia and three additional areas for development. 

One has, what the NHC believes is little if any chance for development in the near future.  It is located just to the east of the Leeward and Windward Islands.  For more information on this area click this sentence.  The NHC gives this location a low chance of development in the next 48 hours.

Far out in the Atlantic is a very strong area of low pressure that was upgraded to Tropical Depression #14 late on Tuesday.  And, the NHC believes this location could be upgraded to Tropical Storm Maria Wednesday or even later tonight.  The long term forecast for Maria would take it towards the US southeast coast early next week.  For more information on the current status and long term forecast of this system, click this sentence.

Katia has been fluctuating wildly from a category one all the way up to a category four major hurricane in the past few days.  One bright spot is that the long term forecast curves Katia out to sea, almost like a boomerang, keeping it away from the United States and Canada.  However, Bermuda will see some type of impact.  For more information on this system click this sentence.

And finally, and most concerning to Texas, the NHC is monitoring an area of low pressure that has developed in the Bay of Campeche in the southwest Gulf of Mexico.  Current computer models indicate this location has a strong potential to develop into at least a Tropical Storm and if it does it's name would be Tropical Storm Nate.  There is no concrete information right now on whether or not this would effect Texas' Great Drought of '11.  For more information on this system click this sentence.

For general tropical information from the National Hurricane Center click this sentence.

Meteorologist Bryan Rupp
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