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Keeping Your Yard Alive During Stage Two Drought

With Wichita Falls wanting to cut overall water use by 15 percent. Many residents now are left wondering if their yards and plants will survive through the summer.
    Wednesday's rain was barely a drop in the bucket, because Wichita Falls city officials still are predicting lake levels to drop below 50- percent by Monday.  And that's the day Stage Two drought  water restrictions start for anyone who uses Wichita Falls' water including residents of Iowa Park, Burkburnett, and Electra.
    But with Wichita Falls wanting to cut overall water use by 15 percent. Many residents now are left wondering if their yards and plants will survive through the summer.
    Lush green lawns and summer don't always go hand in hand especially in the extreme Texoma heat. And with water restrictions on the horizon, Texomans are looking for other ways to help their yards survive.
    "If you were to go out and plant something right it would not be able to survive running your sprinkler once a week, so hand watering is going to be the key," said  Ken Cooper, Harris Nursery.
    Besides hand watering folks this summer will still be able to keep yards lush using soaker hoses or bubblers. But ultimately it boils down to the type of plants you might have in your yard.
    "There's literally thousands of plants that will grow in a dessert situation which is even dryer then what we have so here they just think they are in heaven," said Nyla Dowlearn, Wichita Valley Natural Nursery
     Nursery owner Nayla Dowlearn says native plants survive best. She suggests native plants like, Texas Sage, Lantanas, or Salvias. But even flowers like Periwinkles and Pentas grow well in blazing heat and  with little water.
    "If it's a plant in the ground in the flower bed in the shrub bed and you are having to water it every day you have the wrong plant," said Dowlearn.
     Green thumb experts say with the right plants there still is hope for a beautiful yard this summer.
    Even though we typically think of the spring and summer as times to plant, experts say actually the fall is the best time for planting many perennials, shrubs and trees because it  gives your plants time to take root and get ready for heat and dry months the next year.
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