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Kids Say Some Funny Things!

<p class="p1">Parents, you know you can say all sorts of funny things and now here come cute, clever kids comments.&nbsp; This has been a week of kids say the darndest things.</p> <p class="p2">A verbal little 3 year old came in this week and while I was getting his chart opened on the computer, I asked him what's the matter? He is the third child in the family and is quite comfortable coming to the doctor and is always chatty. His response was,I have the God bless you's. Now I admit that I was not quite sure what he meant? Then it hit me!&nbsp; He was sneezing a lot and that was what the God bless you''s meant.&nbsp; How smart is that!</p> <p class="p1">He then proceeded to tell me that he had been sneezing and coughing. He also happens to have asthma, so I asked him if he had been wheezing as well.&nbsp; His response to all of these questions was equally bright.&nbsp; He said , I haven't had to use my puffer, my breaving is okay. &nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">I examined him (by this time he is watching a cartoon on his iPad) and he was spot on. His lungs were clear as a bell, he had a clear watery runny nose and his nasal mucosa was swollen. He also had allergic eyes.&nbsp; He was using an antihistamine but not his steroid nose spray.&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">So I tweaked his allergy medicines a bit and reminded his mom to have him bathe or shower after he had been playing outside. I also suggested that they use a nasal saline rinse on him as well, as this would help to get the pollens out of his nose after he had been outside, and may be one of the best cures for the God bless you's.&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">Who says children can't give a good history? I often find that the young patient is a great communicator and may open a doctor's eyes to different ways of relaying a new symptom. Whether is from a 3 year old, a tween or a teen, having a patient that you know and that is comfortable talking to the doctor is the key to a good history.&nbsp; This is was a great remind

Parents, you know you can say all sorts of funny things and now here come cute, clever kids comments.  This has been a week of kids say the darndest things.

A verbal little 3 year old came in this week and while I was getting his chart opened on the computer, I asked him what's the matter? He is the third child in the family and is quite comfortable coming to the doctor and is always chatty. His response was,I have the God bless you's. Now I admit that I was not quite sure what he meant? Then it hit me!  He was sneezing a lot and that was what the God bless you''s meant.  How smart is that!

He then proceeded to tell me that he had been sneezing and coughing. He also happens to have asthma, so I asked him if he had been wheezing as well.  His response to all of these questions was equally bright.  He said , I haven't had to use my puffer, my breaving is okay.  

I examined him (by this time he is watching a cartoon on his iPad) and he was spot on. His lungs were clear as a bell, he had a clear watery runny nose and his nasal mucosa was swollen. He also had allergic eyes.  He was using an antihistamine but not his steroid nose spray. 

So I tweaked his allergy medicines a bit and reminded his mom to have him bathe or shower after he had been playing outside. I also suggested that they use a nasal saline rinse on him as well, as this would help to get the pollens out of his nose after he had been outside, and may be one of the best cures for the God bless you's. 

Who says children can't give a good history? I often find that the young patient is a great communicator and may open a doctor's eyes to different ways of relaying a new symptom. Whether is from a 3 year old, a tween or a teen, having a patient that you know and that is comfortable talking to the doctor is the key to a good history.  This is was a great reminder!

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