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Making the Grade Houston Accelerated Readers

<span style="font-size: x-small;">Persuading students to read at a young age can be done. <br><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif;" mce_style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif;">If you explain how it will benefit them for the rest of their lives.</span></span>

Persuading students to read at a young age can be done.
If you explain how it will benefit them for the rest of their lives.
In addition to the regular Accelerated Reading Program, Sam Houston Elementary is teaming up with the sonic on Kell to give kids an incentive to read more everyday.
Eddie Randle explains in "Making the Grade".

You're never too young to start reading books.
Students at Sam Houston start as early as kindergarten.
It's all part of the accelerated reading program.
Students read books and receive points they can eventually exchange for prizes.
2nd grader Kaydence Gomez she says reading allows her to use her imagination.

"I can go into a whole different world", said 2nd grader Kaydence Gomez.
Avienda Garza is in first grade and says she already knows she want to be a book editor.
And after reading 160 books this year alone it's fair to say she's well on her way.

"O feel happy because I'm pushing myself to read allot of books to get information", said 1st grader Avienda Garza.
And every kid in school is hoping to hold the record for most books read but they'll have to beat out 6th grader Andy Flores who's held the record for the past three years.

"In 5th grade I got 500 pts. so I know I had improved my reading that grade. So im starting read at a better level but I have a high reading average", said 6th grader Andy Flores.
This year the school teamed up with Kell street Sonic for the Sonic Boom Challenge.
Every week a new group of AR readers earns a chance to get a treat from Sonic.
This week it was the entire 4th grade class.

"They have had the greatest increase of points of anyone on campus since we started Jan.15th", said AR Co-Coordinator, Kim Schobert .
With incentives like this the books are flying off the shelves.

"They are on fire. Its a happy story when you have happy kids reading", said Schobert.
Teachers say each grade level has surpassed expectations.
The first grade alone has read over 800 books.

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