Mmmmm.....mmmmmmmm

Mmmmm.....mmmmmmmm

Texoma has many traditions, and more than a few focus on food. Saturday in Throckmorton, however, one festival had competitors cooking up something you won't find on most menus.<br>
Jim Stout is no stranger to cooking competitions, but this one is a bit different.

After soaking the tasty treats in a secret marinade, it's time for the grease.

"Just like the ol' commercial said," explained Stout, " 'Crisco will do you proud every time'."

A few minutes later, it's time for some last minute seasoning and then it's off to the judges' table where Jim joins 20 other competitors.

All vying for the title of World Champion Rocky Mountain Oyster Chef.

But you won't find these oysters in any fisherman's net.

As Mack Pirtle, the co-chair of the festival, explained, "In case you don't know what a mountain oyster is, that's what's left over when you make a bull a steer. Enough said."

That's right.

Whether you call them "rocky mountain oysters", "calf fries" or "prairie oysters", they're actually from a bull's sensitive area.

"Everybody that's ever cooked a calf fry has felt the same way," said Stout, "if you're a man, sometimes you just look at those things, and you just cringe. You can feel the pain. There's no two ways about it."

Each entry is judged on taste, texture, and aroma.

For those feeling woozy about eating a calf fry, organizers were on hand giving out pep talks, free of charge.

"Be a man," yelled Pirtle, "try calf fries!"

But the competition isn't just about the food, it's also about the fun.

Just ask the judges, they had a ball.

Reporter's Notes by Ryan Robertson:
Congratulations to Jim Stout for winning back-to-back World Rocky Mountain Oyster Championships.

Jim's team, Farmall Grill, also took first in the pinto beans category.

The County Liners took first in baby back ribs.

The Robin Brothers took top honors in brisket.

Jeter 3 snagged the gold in the dutch oven dessert category.
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