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MSU Staff & Students Would Help Decide to Opt Out of Campus Gun Bill

<br><font size="2"><p dir="LTR">A bill making it legal to carry firearms and ammunition in private vehicles on Texas university and college campuses is closer to becoming law.</p> <p dir="LTR">Senate Bill 1907 has been approved in both the house and senate and a final version may soon be on its way for the governor's signature.</p> <p dir="LTR">But even then, will guns ever be allowed on the Midwestern State campus?</p> <p>Mechell Dixon spoke with MSU officials to find out.</p></font>

If the campus gun bill is signed into law universities could opt-out.

While MSU'S president has made it known he opposes the bill, he says the decision for the school to opt out won't be his alone.

Carrying concealed weapons on college campuses is triggering response on both sides.

While some MSU students make their choice known other voice it.

"I think if you have a CHL then you're qualified and I'd feel safer if I had one, honestly," says Stephen Wilson, an MSU junior who is for the campus gun bill," says Stephen Wilson, an MSU junior who is for bill.

The campus gun bill making its way through the Texas legislature would make it legal to have a firearm in private vehicles on college campuses.

However, if it passesSchool officials could still decide to opt out of making it a law on their campus.

One students says that decision should not just be made by MSU officials.

"I pay their salaries so I'd like them to consider what I think," says Wilson.

MSU's president agrees.

"We will do student forums. We will do faculty forms and certainly, staff, we'll do the same thing for our staff and then I will consult with the board of regents," Dr. Rogers says.

Dr. Rogers says if the bill passes the university would go with the rule of the majority.

"My personal position is that I am very reluctant to have concealed weapons on campus or in the dormatories. It concerns me greatly but we will follow the law and we will follow the will of our students and faculty and board of regents," Dr. Rogers explains.

The House and Senate have passed the campus gun bill.

It's now waiting final votes and signing by the governor.

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