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NSA Leaks Reveal the US Spied on Dozens of World Leaders

Revelations that U.S. spied on dozens of world leaders leads to rifts in relations.
(NBC News) The latest national security leak from Edward Snowden has the white house scrambling tonight to warn spies worldwide that operations they conducted with the U.S. might get exposed.

U.S. allies were already upset learning Wednesday, that the N.S.A. was tapping into the phones of their leaders.

A top to bottom review of U.S. spying had already started when this latest revelation broke.

As President Obama headed to an event in New York, his national security team was sending out a new round of apologies warning U.S. allies that secret joint spying operations with the U.S. could be revealed.

For example, a program to provide U.S. Navy pilots intelligence about Russia.

Intel secretly gathered from a NATO nation in Europe.

If the Putin government knew more about it, said one official, Russia could stop it.

The story broke in the Washington Post.

Again, the source was Edward Snowden.

His revelation, earlier this week, of N.S.A. eaves-dropping on the cellphone calls of 35 world leaders.

From France to Japan and in Germany the revelations sparked a firestorm.

"Spying on close friendship partners is totally unacceptable," said German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel who has demanded that spying end is sending her chief of intelligence to Washington.

On Capitol Hill today, U.S. activists demanded a rollback of spying on Americans.

The Snowden revelations are sparking a re-consideration of all U.S. spying says the State Department.

The administration expects more disclosures by Edward Snowden of programs that some are sure to consider inappropriate.
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