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NYC Officials Fear Invasion of Snakehead Fish

<span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11.818181991577148px; line-height: normal;" mce_style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11.818181991577148px; line-height: normal;">Environmental officials in New York City are warning the public to be on the lookout for an aggressive, air-breathing fish that may be invading the city's waterways.</span><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px none; outline: 0px; font-size: 11.818181991577148px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal;" mce_style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px none; outline: 0px; font-size: 11.818181991577148px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; color: #000000; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal;"><br></span>

Environmental officials in New York City are warning the public to be on the lookout for an aggressive, air-breathing fish that may be invading the city's waterways.

MyFoxNY.com reports the state's Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is asking fishermen in the Harlem Meer to be on the lookout for the northern snakehead fish, a predatory creature native to Asia.

The station reports a local man named Miro Zic claims to have caught one of the fish in October, but the DEC has not confirmed that catch. A snakehead fish was confirmed caught in the area in 2008. 

The fish, which is native to Russia, China and North and South Korea, can destroy an ecosystem if it is allowed to flourish. The fish can breathe air and survive on moist land for several days if it needs to.

The DEC is asking fishermen to remove the fish from the water if they see it, freeze it, and contact their office.

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