81°F
Sponsored by

Oklahoma Athlete Jim Thorpe's Body Remains in Pennsylvania

Even though his tribe and children won their case six months ago to return the remains of the man voted greatest athlete of the 20th century to Oklahoma, his namesake town in Pennsylvania has not given up the fight to keep Jim Thorpe resting in peace there.
Even though his tribe and children won their case six months ago to return the remains of the man voted greatest athlete of the 20th century to Oklahoma, his namesake town in Pennsylvania has not given up the fight to keep Jim Thorpe resting in peace there.

The legal battle over Thorpe's remains has been going on for several years.

In April, the tribes and family won a federal ruling that the town was subject to the Native American Graves Protection Act and must return the remains to Thorpe's tribe and family.

But city officials in Pennsylvania do not want to return the remains. They have built a memorial there and have a festival on his birthday each year.

They have appealed the judge's order and so far, no other developments have occurred.

Jim Thorpe was never even in Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, and how he got there is a different and bizarre story in itself.

According to family members, when he died in 1953, they had started a traditional tribal burial ceremony and meal on the reservation in Oklahoma.

The ceremony was interrupted, however, when his third wife, Patsy, arrived with a hearse and state troopers and they seized the body and drove off.

The widow had previously made a deal with two towns in Pennsylvania that agreed to merge, rename themselves Jim Thorpe, and build a memorial to Thorpe.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Poll

[[viewModel.Question]]

[[result.OptionText]] [[calculateVotePercent(result)]]%
[[settings.DelayedResultsMessage]]
Poll sponsored by