81°F
Sponsored by

President's New Regulation on CO2 Emissions Could Affect Texoma

President Obama's push to regulate and lower the amount of carbon dioxide released by coal burning power plants across the country is drawing criticism from some who say the President's decision to use the environmental protection agency and bypass congress was illegal.
President Obama's push to regulate and lower the amount of carbon dioxide released by coal burning power plants across the country is drawing criticism from some who say the President's decision to use the environmental protection agency and bypass congress was illegal.

Officials at Oklaunion Power Plant say the new regulations could eventually costs all Texomans.

Oklaunion sits just outside of Vernon on Highway 287.

The power station supplies electricity to many Texoma households and businesses.

Stan Whiteford, a spokesman for Public Service Company of Oklahoma which operate Oklaunion, says it's still too early to say how the plant and surrounding communities will be affected by the President's new push.

"It's going to be dependent on what type of plan the state of Texas comes up with to address greenhouse gas emissions for all the facilities in Texas," Whiteford says. 

The new regulations require the state to reduce its CO2 emissions by 39% by 2030.

Whiteford says the Oklaunion plant has scrubbers which help control how much carbon dioxide is released. 

Whiteford says, "That is one of the primary emissions control technologies that is not necessarily on many of the older plants and that is likely to be a target for conversions on many plants."

A conversion the plant can avoid but Whiteford says Texomans' pocketbooks could still take a hit.

"The thing to keep in mind overall is that it is likely that there will be increased electricity costs in general because of this and that's the comment that people across the country are making," Whiteford exclaims. " However, it's important to keep in mind that those impacts are not likely to be uniform across the country."

The EPA proposal covers 1,000 power plants across the country, and more than half fueled by coal.

Opponents of the president plan say electricity costs will shoot up by $289 billion through 2030, but the EPA argues increased energy efficiency will shrink electricity bills by 8%.

The new rules are expected to be finalized next year.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Poll

[[viewModel.Question]]

[[result.OptionText]] [[calculateVotePercent(result)]]%
[[settings.DelayedResultsMessage]]
Poll sponsored by