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SAFB Reveals Sequestration Impact

<p> It's D-Day.</p> <p> The sequester, another name for federal spending cuts, is set to take effect at midnight.</p> <p> Eighty-five billion dollars will be slashed from the defense and domestic spending.</p> <p> It means U.S. military installations, just like Sheppard Air Force Base, will have to make adjustments.</p> <p> Mechell Dixon was on base this afternoon and has more on the impact.</p>


Sheppard Air Force Base officials say there will be no layoffs because of the sequester but they do say other cuts will take place that will impact civilian pay and appearances by military personnel at public events.

According to base public affairs officials, Sheppard employees just over 1,200 appropriated funds civilians, who are civilians directly paid through money budgeted by Congress.

And base officials say if the sequester takes place those people will receive a smaller paycheck.

"Between April and September, employees will be furloughed or placed in a non-pay non-work status for one day each or two days per pay period. So, it basically represents a 20% pay cut over a six month period," says George Woodward, public affairs director at Sheppard Air Force Base.

According to base officials, the impact of the sequester would spill over into the community to the tune of $6-million dollars this fiscal year, which ends in the fall.

But civilian pay won't be the only cuts made here.

"The Air Force expected to cut about 200,000 flying hours. That's military flying hours. That's the core of what we do so that's a significant mission impact because flying and being expert at flying requires constant maintenance. We won't be doing flyover and those kinds of nice to do things. Obviously, when you reduce the amount of people that are at work then some of the things that happen won't be done as well. So, we're not doing flyovers. A lot of times folks will go to an air show and see static displays of military aircraft. We won't be supporting those," explains Woodward.

Sheppard officials say once talk started about the sequester the base started making cuts then.

Those cuts included reducing purchases for supplies and dramatically reducing travel expenses that aren't critical to Sheppard's core training mission.

And officials say they're also looking into other ways to cut costs once the new fiscal year starts in October.

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