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Staying Safe on Halloween

A few simple tips can help keep your little trick-or-treater safe on Halloween.
(NBC News) The L.E.D stick baby costume that went viral a few weeks (www.ledbaby.com) ago isn't for sale until 2014, but there are other things parents can do to keep children visible as they roam the street in search of treats.

"Most costumes don't have reflective garments, so it would be nice to have a child with flashlights," advises Dr. Scott Batchelor, a pediatric emergency physician at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

Pediatricians say fractures are a leading cause of emergency room visits on Halloween, with kids tripping over flowy costumes or bulky masks obstructing their vision.

Some young ones are injured by the costume itself.

"The most common thing we see are kids that have hard accessories, such as swords or other instruments they use as part of the costume, they'll be injuring another child or poking them in the eye or face or causing lacerations," Dr. Batchelor says.

Another common Halloween malady is the late night, candy-induced tummy ache.

Experts recommend feeding kids a hearty dinner on Halloween.

It will cut down on the amount of candy they'll eat later.

Then limit the binge to three to five pieces of their favorite treat.

The most important Halloween safety tip, however, is parent supervision.

All kids under 13 should trick or treat with an adult, even if the child is the one lighting the way.

Flashlights are the easiest way to promote visibility, but glow sticks are also a good option.

Kids can wear glowing necklaces and bracelets, but parents make sure they don't try to eat the colorful liquid; it can be poisonous.
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