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Target 3 Special: Faces of Drought Part Two

With the days of triple digit now on us and the undetermined delay of the water reuse project, it's more important than ever that we make every drop count.
With the days of triple digit now on us and the undetermined delay of the water reuse project, it's more important than ever that we make every drop count.

One industry that can't survive without water is looking at every possible way to cut back.

Scott Plowman owns three restaurants in Wichita Falls and he says in the 30 years he's lived here, he never imagined the water shortage would get this bad. But he says leaving is not an option.

With Wichita Falls in a drought catastrophe Parkway Grill wants people to know they are doing their part to conserve, mandatory or not.

“I've been here 30 years we've always sprayed the floors, sprayed the walls. You can't do that anymore. It's really cut my water bill. We started not serving water years ago to the customer unless they ask,” says Plowman.

“Now we can't thaw food with running water. I’ve actually taken the hoses out, they don't have the hoses here just the one sprayer over the dish water,” says Plowman.

Those conservation methods are even listed at each table.

Plowman says saving as much water as possible while feeding hundreds of people each day isn't easy.

“If you figure I’m feeding over 500 people a day, you do the math. I think restaurants are more economic for water saving than people cooking at home,” says Plowman.

And Plowman believes his restaurants are an important part of the local economy, keeping dollars and over 100 jobs here.

“If you close me one day, there just gonna go somewhere else and it's the same thing. And then you get into, if you close restaurants are you gonna close the mall, Dillards, lawyers offices?,” says Plowman.

He says he hopes it never comes down to that and he is prepared to do what it takes to prevent it.

“We're just gonna make it work and if I have to buy outside water, I guess I’ll do whatever I can. I’m invested in this city,” says Plowman.

A city he says needs to work together to get through this crisis.

“It's really important that everybody, at your house, at the restaurants, anywhere, save water,” says Plowman.

Plowman says he has met with city officials a few times and feels the city is making an effort to work with businesses to make the best decisions for everyone, even if more restrictions are necessary.

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