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Texoma Cattlemen Discuss Drought Outlook

&nbsp;Texoma cattlemen gathered at the MPEC today for the annual Cattle Trails Cow/Calf Conference.<br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp; After a disastrous year because of the drought,weather was one of the main topics...<br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; And&nbsp; what KFDX Meterologist Bryan Rupp told them in his long-range weather trend presentation wasn't too encouraging.....<br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Katie Crosbie joins us now with more.<br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Gwyn, the cattlemen we talked to say Bryan's forecast for continued drought makes them uneasy. They say this is one time they hope the weather man is wrong!<br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; But they also said the rain Texoma received in the fall helped ease some of the strain.<br>
 Texoma cattlemen gathered at the MPEC today for the annual Cattle Trails Cow/Calf Conference.
      After a disastrous year because of the drought,weather was one of the main topics...
        And  what KFDX Meterologist Bryan Rupp told them in his long-range weather trend presentation wasn't too encouraging.....
    Katie Crosbie joins us now with more.
    Gwyn, the cattlemen we talked to say Bryan's forecast for continued drought makes them uneasy. They say this is one time they hope the weather man is wrong!
    But they also said the rain Texoma received in the fall helped ease some of the strain.


Cattle producers were some of the hardest-hit victims of last year's drought.

Larry Lawler
Farmer/Rancher
"I had to cut my cow numbers back about five cows per quarter - section of land. So I'll have a reduced income this next year, cause those five calves won't be available for me to sell this next year."

Like scores of others, Larry Lawler simply didn't have enough pasture to feed all his cows.

"I raise all my own replacements, & if you've got good productive females, well, then you hate to see those sold -- cause that's part of selling off the factory."

Max Gallaway
Stephens Co. Extension Agent

"This past year was terribly, terribly difficult for cattlemen - from the sheer fact that they were not able to grow the forage that they needed to maintain their cow herds."

"I have an animal science degree from college, & I was 60 years old before I figured out that I don't raise cattle. I raise grass, & harvest it with cattle. So the forage is the -- is the kicker of the whole thing."

Stephens County Extension Agent Max Gallaway says a lot of the cattle sold last year were either slaughtered, or shipped north.  He says that will make it tough to find replacement cattle when things finally turn around. 

"If anybody's got any power over how to make it rain, start making it rain!" "Yeah, & we want to meet them!" "That's right!"

Max Gallaway says he doesn't think we'll see the massive amount of cattle being auctioned off this year.  He thinks if cattlemen can, they'll maintain the numbers they have.
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