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Tips to Stop Snoring

<span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal; text-align: left; ">For many, there is nothing worse than losing sleep because of a snoring partner.</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal; text-align: left; "><br></span>

For many, there is nothing worse than losing sleep because of a snoring partner. According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, an estimated 50 percent of Americans have snoring issues.

Dr. Manny Alvarez, senior managing health editor of FoxNews.com, said there are some solutions worth trying.

Alvarez recommended starting with something as simple as changing your sleep position. Laying on your side instead of your back could improve your breathing, and trying a different type of pillow can help you get used to it.

Another underlying issue that can cause snoring is being overweight. Losing a few pounds can relieve some of the pressure on the internal diameter of the throat, which collapses during sleep for people who snore.

One misconception about getting a good night's rest is that having a glass of wine or other alcoholic bevarage before bed can help you drift off to sleep. You may fall asleep faster, but Alvarez said drinking close to bedtime negatively affects the muscles in the back of your throat.

He also suggested taking a shower before bed. It can help open your nasal passages and make it easier to breathe.

Alvarez said although it sounds unconventional, one study finds singing for 20 minutes daily for three months has helped snoring patients keep quiet at night.  

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