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TSA Head Faces Backlash from "Knives on Planes" Decision

On Capitol Hill the head of the Transportation Security Administration got an earful from lawmakers about his plan to allow small knives on airplanes again.

On Capitol Hill the head of the Transportation Security Administration got an earful from lawmakers about his plan to allow small knives on airplanes again.

But Administrator John Pistole says there are far bigger threats than pen knives. He says, "The threat to aviation is from non metallic, improvised explosive devices such a liquid explosives plot we saw from the UK in 2006."

9/11 terrorists with box cutters brought down four airliners and since then, knives and other sharp objects have been banned. Among those opposing the new rule is Representative Ed Markey of Massachusetts who this week introduced his No Knives Act to reverse the TSA decision.

Markey is supported by unions for flight attendants, TSA officers and air marshals. US Airways, American and Delta airlines also object to the new rule. Opponents are hoping a public outcry will send the knife rule the way of the naked body scanners.

Flight attendants in opposition of the rule are urging the public to sign a petition on the White House Website.

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