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Utah Teachers Get Free Gun Training in Response to Newtown Shooting

<span style="font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 25px; ">On Thursday, 200 Utah teachers flocked to an indoor sports arena for free instruction in the handling of firearms by gun activists.</span>

Kasey Hansen, a special education teacher from Salt Lake City, Utah, says she would take a bullet for any of her students, but if faced with a gunman threatening her class, she would rather be able to shoot back.

On Thursday, she was one of 200 Utah teachers who flocked to an indoor sports arena for free instruction in the handling of firearms by gun activists who say armed educators might have a chance of thwarting deadly shooting rampages in their schools.

The event was organized by the Utah Shooting Sports Council in response to the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., this month that killed 20 children and six staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

The council said it has typically attracted about 16 teachers each year to its concealed-carry training courses. But Thursday's event near Salt Lake City, organized especially for educators in the aftermath of Newtown, drew interest from hundreds, and the class was capped at 200 because of space limitations.

"I feel like I would take a bullet for any student in the school district," Hansen, who teaches in a Salt Lake City school district, told Reuters after the training session.

The Newtown massacre reignited a national debate over gun safety. President Barack Obama signaled his support for reinstating a national ban on assault-style rifles and urged Congress to act. The National Rifle Association has called for posting armed guards at schools and rejected new gun-control measures.

The National Education Association and a number of school officials criticized the NRA's stance, but it got a warmer reception in some parts of the West, where hunting and guns are prevalent.

Utah is among a handful of states that allow people with concealed-carry licenses to take their weapons onto school property, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

In Arizona, Attorney General Tom Horne on Wednesday jumped into the debate over school security with a proposal to allow any school to train and arm its principal or another staff member.

The plan, which was backed by at least three sheriffs, would require approval by the legislature and the state's Republican governor, Jan Brewer.

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