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W.F. Citizens Present Suggestions to CFAT

Concern Citizens for Wichita Falls recommends major changes in the school district that may not be what many envisioned.
Several months ago the Wichita Falls school board began drafting a bond proposal to put before voters next may to renovate or rebuild schools in the district. It was based on a facilities study the district received earlier this year.

That study prompted the formation of a Community Facilities Action Team known as CFAT.

Tuesday night a group called Concerned Citizens for Wichita Falls presented the team with the recommendations it feels the team should consider when crafting the final plans and bond issue.

Wichita Falls realtor, Katherine McGregor is the Concerned Citizens for Wichita Falls member who presented the group's proposal to CFAT.

That group is made up of residents of the district and former school administrators.

And she says they are recommending major changes in the school district that may not be what many envisioned.

"If people will look at the plan they'll see that everybody gets something great." 

Local realtor, Katherine McGregor says the plan put together by the Concerned Citizens for Wichita Falls is a major change in how district schools have been set up.

"We hope to build one new city-wide school for 10th through 12th graders and we hope it's located in a central location where it can have high visibility to our citizens and high visibility to perspective businesses," McGregor says.

But not all of the group's proposals would require  new building buildings.

"We do want to utilize some of our buildings.  We know they're older but we think they can be repaired.  We don't want to lose some of our traditions so we want to have a 9th grade center at Barwise that's just for 9th grade," McGregor explains.

Another major change-- all three current high schools  would become junior high schools.

McGregor says she and other group members decided to present their proposals  at the CFAT meeting Tuesday evening.

"We think the timing is right because we're getting ready to have a previous bond roll-off.  When that previous bond leaves we have virtually a $50 million bond with no increase in taxes," McGregor says.

McGregor says last night's proposal was just that--  a proposal of suggestion for CFAT members to consider with all the other options.

It's now up to CFAT to include those recommendations in its report to the school board February, which could give the school board enough time to get the bond on the May ballot for voters.
 
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