78°F
Sponsored by

What's Next for Citizen Surveillance?

How will the Obama administration react to a new ruling declaring widespread NSA surveillance unconstitutional?
(NBC News) N.S.A. Leaker Edward Snowden said today he wants to move to Brazil.

Speaking in Russia today, Snowden said that the culture of indiscriminate surveillance is dying and he offered to help Brazilians investigate how N.S.A spies on them if he gets asylum in that South American nation.

Meanwhile, in a meeting with President Obama on HealthCare.gov, internet titans like Apple, Google and Facebook told the President he must rein in N.S.A. data collection.

Last week, came the revelation that N.S.A is tracking where people surf on the web by piggybacking on Google's detailed tracking.

We also learned that the N.S.A is reportedly piggybacking on phone companies' location tracking, revealing where Americans go and whose paths they might cross.

On Monday a federal court ruled that such phone logging methods are unconstitutional.

That has N.S.A critics mocking the spy agency.

"We're gonna be getting into your emails. We're gonna be getting into the websites that you visit, because it kinda makes us a safer country. Yeah it does. But it doesn't make us a free country, said Independent Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

Backers of government phone logging predict higher courts will find it constitutional

"And it is a major tool in ferreting out a potential terrorist attack," said California Senator Dianne Feinstein who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee.

President Obama plans to announce in January any changes that he might order in N.S.A. surveillance.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Poll

[[viewModel.Question]]

[[result.OptionText]] [[calculateVotePercent(result)]]%
[[settings.DelayedResultsMessage]]
Poll sponsored by