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Wichita Falls Water Reuse Project Plans Released in Video

Wichita Falls, TX. -- With plans to begin using reclaimed waste water next year, the city of Wichita Falls is trying to smooth the transition now by answering questions and concerns residents may have.<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;<br>One way the city is doing that is with a twenty minute video explaining the project.


Wichita Falls, TX. -- With plans to begin using reclaimed waste water next year, the city of Wichita Falls is trying to smooth the transition now by answering questions and concerns residents may have.
  
One way the city is doing that is with a twenty minute video explaining the project.

It seems there's still a lot of questions and even a lack of knowledge about this project....so we went to operations manager Daniel Nix to get some answers.

 Most people we spoke with in Wichita Falls say they are unaware of the city's water reuse plan, but the city is trying to change that.

 "I think it's a fantastic thing but I'm curious as to what resources we're going to be recycling," says Wichita Falls resident Heather Langford.

"Anything that goes down a drain, so it could be your bathroom, it could be your kitchen, it could be your laundry room, it could be business sewage," says Nix.

"As long as it's being tested and coming out the way it's supposed to I don't have any problem with it," says Wichita Falls resident Richard Zuber.

 "We have to go through a 45 day verification study where we're testing a whole bunch of different parameters... we'll be looking at things like metals, inorganic, organics," says Nix.

"If we ever get out of the drought condition are they gonna stop it immediately or is it going to be continuing?," says Wichita Falls resident Kenrick Rochen.

 "Yes and no the emergency direct potable reuse, we will not, once we come out of the drought we will not use that water any longer... once we start the long term indirect potable use which is taking that water from the waste water plant back to lake arrowhead, then it will be used on a daily basis," says Nix.

The emergency reuse project is expected to be up and running by next spring with the permanent project in place within four to five years.

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