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Winding Up

Work on BP's Trinity Hills Windfarm is in the final stages. The facility is expected to go online in about 6 weeks.
It seems fitting for a land long known for its energy producing ways, to be the sight of what some call "the energy of the future."

"This is a completely clean, renewable energy," said Scott Willis, Facility Manager at Trinity Hills Windfarm near Olney, "There's no emissions, no oils or gasses that leak on the ground. No type of fuel other than the wind."

It's taken more than three years, but BP's Trinity Hills Wind Farm is almost complete.

All 90 turbines are up, and crews are now in the process of commissioning them, or making sure they're ready to spin.

"I think we have roughly 65 out of the 90 that have been tested and run," said Willis, "we're just finishing up."

From tip to tip, the massive blades are around 300 feet across, and produce around 690 volts of electricity.

Electricity which is pumped from Trinity Hills, into the grid, and to your home.

Before the electricity gets to your home, however, it goes through a series of transformers where the electricity is stepped up from 690 volts to 345,000 volts.

It's enough power to run around 90,000 thousand homes.

Impressive numbers, but what may really blow you away, is each turbine automatically adjusts to wind speed and direction, so it always runs at the perfect pace.

"The blades pitch independently," explained Willis, "so they can speed up or slow down depending on how fast the wind is blowing."

Trinity Hills is scheduled to go online and start producing electricty in March.

Then the mechanical marvels will do their part to usher in a new era in Texas energy production.

"If the wind doesn't blow, we don't make electricity," said Willis, "if the wind does blow, which it does quite frequently here, it's making clean renewable energy."

Reporter's Notes by Ryan Robertson:

Scott Willis with BP said this project is attracting attention not just from area residents, but from employees as well.

Many of the technicians employed at Trinity Hills have Texoma ties, and requested to be assigned to the Trinity Hills Wind Farm.
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