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Long Term Water Reuse Feasibility Study Report Given

<br><p dir="LTR">The city council today received a progress report on the Long Term Water Reuse Feasibility Study.</p> <p dir="LTR"><br></p>

The city council today received a progress report on the Long Term Water Reuse Feasibility Study.

The city is searching for the most efficient and practical way to increase the city's water supply and treating waste water that now goes down the river is one way.

How to get that waste water back into the city's treatment system is one question city leaders must answer.

City public works officials says consulting engineers came up with four alternatives.

One of those is to secure a discharge permit and pump the water into Lake Arrowhead or Lake Wichita or build a new micro-filtration plant at either Cypress or Jasper water treatment plants.

Consultants recommended the Lake Arrowhead alternative, and public works officials that choice is the most cost effective.

"We'll have to do some improvements to the waste water treatment plant to take the phosphorus out of the water but once that's out I don't anticipate any problems securing a discharge permit at this point and we think this is definitely the most viable option," says Russell Schreiber, public works director for the City of Wichita Falls.

The next step for the project is to secure a discharge permit from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Schreiber says the entire project should take three to five to complete at a cost of between $28 and $29 million.

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