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No Such Thing as "No Risk" in an Investment

How can you tell a legitimate investment opportunity from a scam? Here are two words you should keep in mind that could prevent you from losing your life savings.
How can you tell a legitimate investment opportunity from a scam? Here are two words you should keep in mind that could prevent you from losing your life savings.

Nathan Amsden spent years saving so he could start making modest investments to prepare for his children's college education. Then Nathan met Bill Orestis who began laying the groundwork to lure Nathan into an investment scam.

Orestis was very persuasive and offered to put money in himself. He showed Nathan documentation illustrating what appeared to be the investment's track record.

Meanwhile, the conmen continued to ask Nathan for more money.

Nathan was not alone. There were 18 victims who lost $1.4 million in this scam. By the end, Nathan had invested $60,000.

US Postal Inspector Dan Forristal wants all consumers to remember. "The big thing we always see is "no risk" the term investment in general implies risk. They go side by side. There is no investment you can make that doesn't have risk."

Orestis was sentenced to almost 3 years in prison followed by 3 years of supervised release.
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