Training Tips for Hotter’N Hell Hundred

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Dail Neely plays a critical role as Hotter’N Hell’s head rest stop coordinator.

“The rest stop coordinators — you know they’ll do a theme. I think rest stop two is usually a pirate ship. Rest stop 14 is a winter wonderland. They have big snoglobes,” Neely said.

As a cyclist himself, he also helps train people with advice and by coordinating group rides. So we wanted to know – with less than two months away from Hotter’N Hell – is it too late to start training for the big ride?

“No, gosh no. Definitely not too late to start,” Neely said.

But if you are starting now, he said you should be riding six days a week and taking one day off.

“If you’re coming straight off of the couch — you’re probably not going to want to do the 100 miles,” Neely said.

There are a variety of ride lengths from 10k up to 100 miles.

If you want to train to ride the longer distances, but you have a tight schedule, Neely said you can work around it.

“Dr. Frank Wyatt, who is a kinesiology professor at Midwestern, you know — he says if you’re short on time – so you can’t get the long miles in – go for intensity,” Neely said.

While he said saddle time is important — because it trains your body to be on the bike for longer periods — you can still participate in the rides, if you plan out your training schedule well.

“The rule of thumb is — you can typically on a single day ride…. ride what you average per week. So if you ride that 100 miles a week, you can make that 100 mile ride,” Neely said.

If you gradually work your distance up on your weekends, he recommends adding on five miles per week onto your longer rides.

Do not forget to eat and drink plenty of fluids along your long rides, because it is vital to helping your body power through the distance.

“We talked to riders at the end of the ride — you know, why do you keep coming back to Hotter’N Hell? It’s the rest stops. It’s because the people are so friendly and so helpful and want to see them succeed,” he said.

HHH stands out because of the rest stops and plenty of nutrition is their specialty.

Neely said to avoid some of these rookie mistakes: buying new equipment within a few weeks leading up to the ride, do not over hydrate and take it easy at the start.

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